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Steps Toward Free Speech on Campus

When we began our study of higher education seven years ago, we had clear expectations about what we would hear from various constituencies. Our predictions were frequently off the mark. We had expected to hear a lot about political disputes on campus, but in fact, across constituencies, we heard much more about personal problems: student […]

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Longing to Belong: An Important Issue for Higher Education

by Wendy Fischman In higher education, the context can shift quickly. When we began our national study in 2012, higher education seemed to be highly valued (funding for Pell grants nearly doubled), MOOCs were on the rise, and “liberal arts” as a form of education was admired and emulated in many parts of the world. […]

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Six Fault Lines in Higher Education

In early January 2019, I gave the first public presentations on our seven year study of higher education in the United States: two talks (with Senior Project Manager Wendy Fischman) at the Council of Independent Colleges; and three talks at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (titled, informally and respectively, “What We Did”; “What We […]

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First Steps Toward Going Public: Our Study at the Start of 2019

by Howard Gardner and Wendy Fischman So here we are, right at the edge of going public. It’s been nearly seven years since, with our esteemed colleague Richard Light, we conceived of a major—arguably the major—qualitative study of higher education in the United States in our time. From 2012-2018, with the support of a remarkably gifted […]

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“Takeaways” for College Presidents

As we enter 2019, our national study of higher education is in its 7th year! During these years, my colleagues and I have often been asked to speak publicly about our findings. But as long as we were still collecting data, this was not possible; and even after data collection has now been completed, we […]

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