Tag Archives: Featured News

Wolfram and Gardner Discuss Computational Thinking

Howard Gardner and Stephen Wolfram shared the stage on November 6, 2017, at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to discuss Wolfram’s theories of computational thinking. Stephen Wolfram is the creator several innovative computational systems and the founder and CEO of Wolfram Research. According to his website, he is a pioneer in the area of […]

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Contrasting Views of Human Behavior and Human Mind: An Epistemological Drama in Five Acts

Last month, I received an unexpected communication from Dr. Henry (Hank) Schlinger, a scholar whom I did not know. As he pointed out, this was a somewhat delayed communication, since it referred to an article of mine written quite some time ago.  In his note to me, Dr. Schlinger argued that I had been mistaken in my assertion that […]

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Comment on “Three Cognitive Dimensions for Tracking Deep Learning Progress”

The original metaphor for each of the several intelligences was that of a computer, or a computational device. I sought to convey that that there exist different kinds of information in the world—information deliberately more abstract than a signal to a specific sensory organ—and that the human mind/brain has evolved to be able to assimilate […]

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The Professions: Can They Help Us Invigorate Non-Professional Education?

For many years, within the United States, the phrases “higher education” and “the professions” have evoked different associations. When you go to a four year college to pursue higher education, you are supposed to sample broadly across subject matters and disciplines; hone your speaking and writing abilities; and master critical (and perhaps creative) thinking. In […]

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The von Humboldt Brothers—As Scholars and Siblings

In the previous blog, I introduced two remarkable scholars from the early 19th century, Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835), linguist and architect of the Prussian educational system; and his younger brother, Alexander (1769-1859), naturalist, explorer, traveler, and masterful speaker and essayist. Here I explore whether their sibling status and birth order may have contributed to their distinctive […]

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