Tag Archives: Life-Long Learning: A Blog in Education

The COVID Pivot: Higher Education at a Crossroads

by Wendy Fischman and Howard Gardner  A Changed Educational Landscape In March 2020, as was the case in nearly every sector in society, college campuses shut down—higher education was forced to shift to a virtual experience. Within days of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, American higher education—developed and honed over hundreds of years […]

2 Comments Continue Reading →

In a Word: The Adjective Question

by Sophie Blumert  If you could describe the students at your school in one word… Sometimes, in an hour-long discussion or interview, a single word can be powerful—one word can signal a lot about one’s perspective. In our large, national study of higher education we asked participants what we thought of as a warm-up question: […]

Leave a Comment Continue Reading →

College Courses: Time Well Spent, or a Waste of Time?

by Sophie Blumert “Tell us about the courses you’ve taken: which ones were time well spent, and which ones were a waste of time?” In our national study of higher education, we asked nearly 1000 students this very question. This question helped us to gain concrete information about courses and, at the same time, proved […]

Leave a Comment Continue Reading →

The Power, Pitfalls, and Practice of Online Higher Education

by Christina Smiraglia Colleges have debated and experimented with online education for more than a decade, but digital approaches have recently come to the fore given the necessary physical distancing   measures in place across much of the U.S. – and other countries – in the wake of COVID-19. In our national study of American higher […]

2 Comments Continue Reading →

“If You Were the Czar…”: Answers from College Stakeholders

by Christina Smiraglia If you were the czar—a figure with absolute power—what changes would you make to your college’s academic program?  This weighty question was a standard part of the interview protocol for the approximately 2000 participants—first-year and graduating students, faculty, administrators, parents, and alumni—in our study of American higher education. Some immediately said that […]

Leave a Comment Continue Reading →